Impact Factor 2.323

The 1st most cited journal in Multidisciplinary Psychology

This article is part of the Research Topic

Beyond reward: insights from love and addiction

Mini Review ARTICLE

Front. Psychol., 31 August 2016 | https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2016.01335

Cue Reactivity in Nicotine and Alcohol Addiction: A Cross-Cultural View

  • 1Chinese Academy of Sciences Key Laboratory of Brain Function and Disease, School of Life Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, China
  • 2School of Humanities and Social Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, China
  • 3School of Foreign Languages, Anhui Jianzhu University, Hefei, China
  • 4Center for Biomedical Engineering, School of Information Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, China
  • 5Center of Medical Physics and Technology, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, China

A wealth of research indicates that cue reactivity is critical to understanding the neurobiology of nicotine and alcohol addiction and developing treatments. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and electroencephalograph (EEG) studies have shown abnormal cue reactivity in various conditions between nicotine or alcohol addicts and the healthy. Although the causes of these abnormalities are still unclear, cultural effect can not be ignored. We conduct an review of fMRI and EEG studies about the cue reactivity in nicotine and alcohol addiction and highlight the cultural perspective. We suggest that cultural cue reactivity is a field worth of exploring which may has an effect on addictive behavior through emotion and attention. The cultural role of nicotine and alcohol addiction would provide new insight into understanding the mechanisms of nicotine and alcohol addiction and developing culture-specific therapies. We consider that culture as a context may be a factor that causes confusing outcomes in exploring nicotine and alcohol addiction which makes it possible to control the cultural influences and further contribute to the more consistent results.

Introduction

Addiction as one of the leading causes of poor health worldwide, has drawn the attention of public including researchers decades ago. Nicotine and alcohol addiction as two of the most common addiction are widely observed because of legalization. Nicotine addiction has been proved to lead to health problems, such as lung cancer, ischemic heart disease and esophageal cancer while alcohol addiction can also cause problems of our health and safety (Castellsagué et al., 1999; Koob and Moal, 2005; Florek and Piekoszewski, 2008; Patel and Feucht, 2010). Additionally, nicotine and alcohol addiction are proved to have an effect on cognition, such as attention and memory (Wiers et al., 2015). Evidence has shown that there existing abnormal functional and structural changes in the brain of nicotine or alcohol addicts (Williams, 1980; Ray et al., 2009; Zhang et al., 2009, 2011a; Vollstädt-Klein et al., 2010a; Bjork and Gilman, 2013).

Although the huge negative influences have been shown, the craving for smoking or drinking in nicotine or alcohol addicts is so difficult to overcome which can lead to relapse over and over again. As a result, the cessation rates remain low and researchers have done a lot to improve a successful cessation with the substance related cue-induced craving which is intense and episodic and can contribute to relapse of addiction (Sinha and Li, 2007; Ferguson and Shiffman, 2009). Although recently, findings show that factor such as trait impulsivity has been considered to partly cause cessation failure (Erblich and Michalowski, 2015) and craving has been proved to be not a necessary condition of relapse (Wray et al., 2013), cue reactivity still plays a very important role in addiction.

Culture as a kind of context may cause differences in behavior (Li et al., 2015). Different cultures may have contributed to different traits in nicotine and alcohol addiction which may provided new sight for the cue reactivity in addiction. We reviewed some reports using EEG and fMRI which try to explain the relationship between culture and the cue-induced activity in nicotine and alcohol addiction.

Cue Reactivity in Nicotine and Alcohol Addiction

Cue Reactivity in Smoking or Alcoholic Behavior

As literature has shown, smoking or alcohol-related cues can elicit craving (Erblich and Bovbjerg, 2004; Vollstädt-Klein et al., 2011a; Yarmush et al., 2016) and facilitate the addictive behavior in nicotine or alcohol addicts (Wigmore and Hinson, 1991; Shiffman et al., 2013).

As noted earlier, cue exposure was associated with changes in cognitive function (Bates et al., 2002; Durazzo and Meyerhoff, 2007; Vollstädt-Klein et al., 2009, 2012; Wiers et al., 2013). Studies suggested that addicts show attention bias for the substance-related cues which caused by the expectation of the substance (Field and Cox, 2008; Luijten et al., 2011; Vollstädt-Klein et al., 2011b; Ramirez et al., 2014) and addicts represent the substance-related pathological memory with which the substance-related cues might obtain the power to motivate (Hyman, 2005).

In all, exposed to smoking or alcohol-related cues, smokers or alcoholics change their behavioral patterns. It seems that nicotine and alcohol addicts are susceptible to the substance-related context which may plays an important part in the abnormal addictive process and is worthy of exploring.

Cue Reactivity in Neural Responses in Nicotine and Alcohol Addiction

Cue Reactivity with EEG

As non-invasive measure of human brain function, EEG technique has been widely used in nicotine and alcohol addiction to detect specific sensory and cognitive event to specific cues. What’s more, the P3 of the event-related potentials (ERPs) related to the involvement of motivational and arousal systems (Petit et al., 2015) and the Slow Positive Waves (SPWs) of the ERPs which reflect the brain’s activation of motivational systems to emotional cues (Cuthbert et al., 2000) were most suggested. It is indicated that both P3 and SPW amplitudes in response to smoking cues are significantly more enhanced in smokers than in the healthy at frontal and central sites indicating that smokers show more attention bias for smoking cues (Namkoong et al., 2004; Littel and Franken, 2007; Marianne et al., 2012).

The larger amplitude of P3 was also observed in non-smokers in response to smoking cues than neutral cues (Mcdonough and Warren, 2001) while non-alcoholics show no significant differences in P3 amplitudes even though the larger P3 was observed in alcoholics when faced with alcohol-related cues than neural cues (Namkoong et al., 2004). One explanation is that non-smokers may get hurt from the secondhand smoking so that they are also sensitive to smoking cues while the non-alcoholics are not always concerned about alcohol given that the alcohol cannot hurt them directly. It seems that addiction has lead to a bit different consequences in motivation and arousal which may be caused by the different context between nicotine and alcohol addiction.

Cue Reactivity with fMRI

Abundant fMRI evidences have suggested that cue-induced reactivity among nicotine or alcohol addicts is different from the healthy which shows functional and structural abnormalities in the brain of addicts as stated earlier. Furthermore, brain regions associated with anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and other regions in attentional network including orbitofrontal prefrontal cortex, default mode networks involved precuneus, salience network including insula and the reward network refered to amygdala and striatum appear to be stimulated abnormally by smoking cues (Due et al., 2002; Brody et al., 2007; Franklin et al., 2011; Zhang et al., 2011b) and alcohol-related cues (Vollstädt-Klein et al., 2010b; Claus et al., 2013; Dager et al., 2014).

With these results, researchers have explored the important functions of these regions in nicotine and alcohol addiction (Vollstädt-Klein et al., 2010b; Zhang et al., 2011a; Hayashi et al., 2013; Lerman et al., 2014). However, whether the role these regions played in nicotine and alcohol addiction are same or not is an open question.

The addiction severity of nicotine has been reported negatively correlated with smoking cue-induced activity in amygdala (Vollstädt-Klein et al., 2011a) while evidence showed that the severity of alcohol was positively associated with amygdala response to alcohol-related cues among alcoholics (Claus et al., 2011). As researches on amygdala showed significant association with the processing of learned reward values of conditioned cues and context (Robbins et al., 2008), the different role of amygdala in nicotine and alcohol addiction indicated that the sensitivity to context between smokers and alcoholics is different. As a result, context plays an important role in the formation of nicotine and alcohol addiction.

In addition, alcohol-related cue-induced activity in the ventral striatum showed positive correlation with self-reported alcohol craving (Myrick et al., 2004; Seo et al., 2011). As the correlation between cigarette craving and ventral striatum response to smoking cues yielded mixed results, with both negative correlations (Mcclernon et al., 2005) and null correlations (David et al., 2005) which is different from the results in alcohol addiction, we can infer that the ventral striatum plays different roles in the craving for smoking or drinking. The ventral striatum has been reported to make great contribution to behavioral conditioning reflecting the reward value predicted by discriminative cues (Schultz et al., 1997). It seems that the reward value of smoking cues to smokers is different from that of alcohol-related cues to alcoholics which may be due to the different craving elicited by the different context around them.

Cultural Effect in General

General Cultural Effect on Behaviors

Behavioral differences between Eastern and Western cultures has been explored widely. It’s said that East Asians and Asian-Americans pay more attention to the background than European Americans who tend to focus on the foreground and focal objects with several tasks (Goto et al., 2013). In line with that, East Asians are likely to attribute the behavior to social context while Westerners tend to attribute the same thing to their internal dispositions (Choi et al., 1998). Nisbett analyzed these findings and concluded that East Asian’ cognitive styles are characterized as more holistic and European American cognitive styles are characterized as more analytic (Nisbett et al., 2001; Nisbett and Miyamoto, 2005). Besides, as for the social behavior, East Asians were interdependent and collectivism whereas Westerns were independent and individualism (Suh et al., 1998). Culture is closely related to our behavioral patterns and different cultures can induce different behavioral patterns.

Cultural Effect on Neural Responses

Cultural Effect with EEG

Research on cognition beyond observable behavioral performance with EEG revealed some neural differences in different cultures. To our knowledge, most of the research results are related to the Eastern and Western cultures indicating the huge differences between the two distinctive cultures while the cultural differences among different Western cultures are seldom revealed. Research results suggested that there is cultural effect in motivational responses to felt misunderstanding (Lun et al., 2010). Besides, there are fundamental differences in the distribution of EEG between Easterners and Westerners as EEG asymmetry between Japanese and Westerners is different (Moss et al., 1985).

One study utilizing the good time solution of EEG suggested that Chinese and Italian attend the commercials with the same theme in different moment reflecting the different span of attention (Vecchiato et al., 2011). Although the early ERP components in the processing of emotional pictures is not modulated by the cultures in European and Japanese, the late stage of the processing is different (Fleming et al., 2010). Further, huge evidence about cognitive differences between East and West with respect to emotion such as semantic affective processing (Goto et al., 2013) and expression of emotion with the N400 (Liu et al., 2015), and emotion suppression by the parietal late positive potential (Murata et al., 2012) indicating that Easterners are more sensitive to the relationship between context and objects than Westerners. In addition to emotion, the most discussed was cultural differences in self-construal which may be different from the processing of the emotion by the differences in N400, P3 and the early component N170 in various conditions (Lewis et al., 2008; Vizioli et al., 2010; Masuda et al., 2014).

Cultural Effect with fMRI

Quantitative fMRI studies has been conducted to examine cultural differences. Results have revealed specific regions related to cultural effect between Eastern and Western cultures in the neural responses to various stimulus. However, given the variation of the culture-specific task, the cultural effect can be concluded in general that social cognitive tasks such as cultural self-referential and self-representation are related the responses in the medial prefrontal cortex and ACC (Zhu et al., 2007; Sul et al., 2012). Non-social cognitive tasks such as processing of faces and attentional control are associated with the activation of attentional network (Gutchess et al., 2006; Hedden et al., 2008; Goh et al., 2010). Social effective tasks such as emotional pain perception, recognition of emotions, empathy, and fearful faces may refer to the different activation patterns of insula, amygdala and ACC (Moriguchi et al., 2005; Chiao et al., 2008; Derntl et al., 2009, 2012; Cheon et al., 2011, 2013; Greck et al., 2012).

Studies focus on the emotion among different Western cultures also have disclosed some rules. Firstly, there are similar neural activity in amygdala which is associated with emotion when viewing image of same or other-race faces among African-American and Caucasian-American individuals (Lieberman et al., 2005). However, Western cultures also showed neural differences which may be related to emotion as the fact that the neural correlation of empathic resonance for pain in participants with different Western cultures is different (Azevedo et al., 2013). Besides, during a social evaluative task, it is concluded that White Americans generally exhibited more activation in regions associated with conflict resolution and cognitive control, while African Americans (AA) exhibited activation mostly in areas associated with emotion and memory (Greer et al., 2012).

Summary

In all, culture between Eastern and Western have shown differences with respect to attention, emotion and self-construal while studies on Western cultural differences focus on the emotion factors. It seems that the emotional and attentional factors play important roles in general cultural differences while the self-construal-related context may play an essential role in cultural difference between Eastern and Western cultures but not among different Western cultures.

Cultural Effect in Nicotine and Alcohol Addiction

Cultural Effect on Addictive Behaviors in Nicotine and Alcohol Addiction

Given the large influences on behavior stated earlier, culture may have an effect on addictive behaviors. Some direct evidences have shown that culture is a factor influencing the use behavior of alcohol (Zane and Sasao, 2010; Krentzman et al., 2012) and cigarette (Benowitz, 1996; Florek and Piekoszewski, 2008; Coleman-Cowger and Catlin, 2013). For example, AA smokers smoke fewer cigarettes per day, metabolize nicotine much lower, prefer mentholated cigarettes and have a higher level of nicotine dependence than Caucasians (CC) smokers (Benowitz, 1996; Coleman-Cowger and Catlin, 2013). As a result, it is more difficult for AA smokers to make a successful quit than CC smokers, although they were reported to make more quit attempts (Fiore et al., 1989). In addition, different cultures have caused various views on smoking (Finkenauer et al., 2009) or drinking (Caetano et al., 1998) and different motivation for smoking (Sánchez-Johnsen et al., 2006) or drinking (Nagoshi et al., 1994; Piko, 2007).

Take the essential emotion factors in nicotine and alcohol addiction and the fact that perceptions of emotion are not culturally universal (Gendron et al., 2014) into consideration, culture may be a factor that influences the neural responses of different addiction. For example, smoking and drinking in some Eastern cultures like Chinese are just a form of social contact which involves complex emotion while in Western cultures things are different as people usually smoke or drink by themselves. Given the fact stated above, the emotion factors in different cultures of nicotine and alcohol addiction may not always be the same.

Additionally, there are actually disparities of cognition for addicts regrading to different cultures. To our knowledge, a research showed that Dutch adolescents had an avoidance bias toward both smoking and neutral pictures, while American adolescents didn’t have a significant bias toward either smoking or neutral pictures (Larsen et al., 2014).

Above all, culture has an effect on addictive behavior in nicotine and alcohol addiction and both emotion and attention which are related to cue reactivity play important roles in the cultural effect. It seems that cultural effect on cue reactivity of smokers and alcoholics are associated with emotion and attention.

Cultural Effect on Neural Responses in Nicotine and Alcohol Addiction

Furthermore, studies focusing on different neural responses among cross-cultural smokers have shown that cultural difference is a possible factor in modifying the effect of nicotine. Okuyemi et al. (2006) has done a research to examine whether smokers from different cultural background process smoking-related cues in a different way using fMRI. The experiment were conducted among AA and CC smokers which is related to racial effect. However, as the ethnicity is not the cause but the result of cultural phenomenon (Claude, 1952), it also have proved a strong cultural effect on neural responses by showing that the brain activation to smoking cues (versus neutral cues) of AA smokers is stronger than CC smokers in several priori regions of interest.

In addition, the disparities of cultural neural responses can also be tracked by the comparison of some studies. A study suggested that chronic smokers from China showed decreased activation in the left thalamus (Liao et al., 2012), while another study suggested smokers from Australia showed decreased thalamus activation in the right side (Almeida et al., 2008). It seems that the activation of several regions are different among smokers or alcoholics with different cultures which should be further studied.

Summary

Overall, culture as a kind of context influences the behavior and the neural activity in addiction and there may be two main ways. Firstly, culture affects the emotion of individuals which may causes different arousing to the emotional factors of the cues and elicits the culture-specific neural responses in nicotine and alcohol addiction. Secondly, culture may has an effect on the attention of the nicotine and alcohol addicts. And with the two factors associated with cue reactivity in nicotine and alcohol addiction, culture may have an effect on the cue reactivity.

Unsolved Problems

Although, we have found that culture could influence the cue reactivity in nicotine and alcohol addiction which is related to emotion and attention, some questions are still unclear. Firstly, causes of the differences between nicotine and alcohol addiction are uncertain. Although, we have supposed that the different context may be the reason, we can not exclude the possibility that nicotine and alcohol have different effects on nervous system given that there is no research comparing the effects of these incompatible substances directly. Secondly, we found that the differences between Western and Eastern cultures are more significant than among Western cultures, which we speculated may be caused by more commonalities within Western cultures. But it still needs more targeted research. Thirdly, there are cultural effect on nicotine and alcohol addiction, but literature focusing on the cultural effects on neural responses in nicotine and alcohol addiction is rare, the neural basis is far from fully understood. In addition, we have known that addicts with different cultures have different responses to the substance-related cues, but the cues used in these researches are not the same which may relate to culture-specific factors. Whether the addicts have stronger responses to the culture-specific cues still need further research.

With the solution to these questions, we could have a better understanding of the cultural effect on nicotine and alcohol addiction and the neural mechanisms of them, which would be beneficial to improve the treatments by developing culture-specific treatments of addiction. Besides, understanding the cultural effect would make it possible to control the cultural factor to resolve the inconsistencies caused by culture. At last, objective differences in neural responses caused by cultural effect may improve our rational knowledge of cultural differences in general which may further contribute to the elimination of misunderstandings among different cultures.

Author Contributions

XZ supervised this study and revised each draft. WL and QW wrote this paper. XL, YC, HS, and LY provided suggestions on this paper.

Conflict of Interest Statement

The authors declare that the research was conducted in the absence of any commercial or financial relationships that could be construed as a potential conflict of interest.

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by grants from the National Natural Science Foundation of China (31230032, 31171083, 31471071, 31500917), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (WK2070000033), Hefei Science Center, CAS “SHMFF” (2015HSC-UP017).

References

Almeida, O. P., Garrido, G. J., Lautenschlager, N. T., Hulse, G. K., Jamrozik, K., and Flicker, L. (2008). Smoking is associated with reduced cortical regional gray matter density in brain regions associated with incipient Alzheimer disease. Am. J. Geriatr. Psychiatry 16, 92–98. doi: 10.1097/JGP.0b013e318157cad2

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Azevedo, R. T., Macaluso, E., Avenanti, A., Santangelo, V., Cazzato, V., and Aglioti, S. M. (2013). Their pain is not our pain: brain and autonomic correlates of empathic resonance with the pain of same and different race individuals. Hum. Brain Mapp. 34, 3168–3181. doi: 10.1002/hbm.22133

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Bates, M. E., Bowden, S. C., and Barry, D. (2002). Neurocognitive impairment associated with alcohol use disorders: implications for treatment. Exp. Clin. Psychopharmacol. 10, 193–212. doi: 10.1037/1064-1297.10.3.193

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Benowitz, N. L. (1996). Cotinine as a biomarker of environmental tobacco smoke exposure. Epidemiol. Rev. 18, 188–204. doi: 10.1093/oxfordjournals.epirev.a017925

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Bjork, J. M., and Gilman, J. M. (2013). The effects of acute alcohol administration on the human brain: insights from neuroimaging. Neuropharmacology 84, 101–110. doi: 10.1016/j.neuropharm.2013.07.039

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Brody, A. L., Mandelkern, M. A., Olmstead, R. E., Jou, J., Tiongson, E., Allen, V., et al. (2007). Neural substrates of resisting craving during cigarette cue exposure. Biol. Psychiatry 62, 642–651. doi: 10.1016/j.biopsych.2006.10.026

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Caetano, R., Clark, C. L., and Tam, T. (1998). Alcohol consumption among racial/ethnic minorities: theory and research. Alcohol Health Res. World 22, 233–241.

Google Scholar

Castellsagué, X., Muñoz, N., De Stefani, E., Victora, C. G., Castelletto, R., Rolón, P. A., et al. (1999). Independent and joint effects of tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking on the risk of esophageal cancer in men and women. Int. J. Cancer 82, 657–664. doi: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0215(19990827)82:5<657::AID-IJC7>3.0.CO;2-C

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Cheon, B. K., Im, D. M., Harada, T., Kim, J. S., Mathur, V. A., Scimeca, J. M., et al. (2011). Cultural influences on neural basis of intergroup empathy. Neuroimage 57, 642–650. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2011.04.031

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Cheon, B. K., Im, D. M., Harada, T., Kim, J. S., Mathur, V. A., Scimeca, J. M., et al. (2013). Cultural modulation of the neural correlates of emotional pain perception: the role of other-focusedness. Neuropsychologia 51, 1177–1186. doi: 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2013.03.018

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Chiao, J. Y., Gordon, I. H. L., Nogawa, J., Bar, M., Aminoff, E., Sadato, N., et al. (2008). Cultural specificity in amygdala response to fear faces. J. Cogn. Neurosci. 20, 2167–2174. doi: 10.1162/jocn.2008.20151

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Choi, I., Nisbett, R. E., and Norenzayan, A. (1998). Causal attribution across cultures: variation and universality. Psychol. Bull. 125, 47–63. doi: 10.1037/0033-2909.125.1.47

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Claude, L. S. (1952). Race et Histoire. Le Racisme Devant La Science. Paris: UNESCO.

Claus, E. D., Blaine, S. K., Filbey, F. M., Mayer, A. R., and Hutchison, K. E. (2013). Association between nicotine dependence severity, BOLD response to smoking cues, and functional connectivity. Neuropsychopharmacology 38, 2363–2372. doi: 10.1038/npp.2013.134

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Claus, E. D., Ewing, S. W., Filbey, F. M., Sabbineni, A., and Hutchison, K. E. (2011). Identifying neurobiological phenotypes associated with alcohol use disorder severity. Neuropsychopharmacology 36, 2086–2096. doi: 10.1038/npp.2011.99

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Coleman-Cowger, V. H., and Catlin, M. L. (2013). Changes in tobacco use patterns among adolescents in substance abuse treatment. J. Subst. Abuse Treat. 45, 227–234. doi: 10.1016/j.jsat.2013.02.004

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Cuthbert, B. N., Schupp, H. T., Bradley, M. M., Birbaumer, N., and Lang, P. J. (2000). Brain potentials in affective picture processing: covariation with autonomic arousal and affective report. Biol. Psychol. 52, 95–111. doi: 10.1016/S0301-0511(99)00044-7

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Dager, A. D., Anderson, B. M., Rosen, R., Khadka, S., Sawyer, B., Jiantonio-Kelly, R. E., et al. (2014). Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) response to alcohol pictures predicts subsequent transition to heavy drinking in college students. Addiction 109, 585–595. doi: 10.1111/add.12437

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

David, S. P., Munafò, M. R., Johansen-Berg, H., Smith, S. M., Rogers, R. D., Matthews, P. M., et al. (2005). Ventral striatum/nucleus accumbens activation to smoking-related pictorial cues in smokers and nonsmokers: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study. Biol. Psychiatry 58, 488–494. doi: 10.1016/j.biopsych.2005.04.028

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Derntl, B., Habel, U., Robinson, S., Windischberger, C., Kryspin-Exner, I., Gur, R. C., et al. (2009). Amygdala activation during recognition of emotions in a foreign ethnic group is associated with duration of stay. Soc. Neurosci. 4, 294–307. doi: 10.1080/17470910802571633

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Derntl, B., Habel, U., Robinson, S., Windischberger, C., Kryspin-Exner, I., Gur, R. C., et al. (2012). Culture but not gender modulates amygdala activation during explicit emotion recognition. BMC Neurosci. 13:54. doi: 10.1186/1471-2202-13-54

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Due, D. L., Huettel, S. A., Hall, W. G., and Rubin, D. C. (2002). Activation in mesolimbic and visuospatial neural circuits elicited by smoking cues: evidence from functional magnetic resonance imaging. Am. J. Psychiatry 159, 954–960. doi: 10.1176/appi.ajp.159.6.954

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Durazzo, T. C., and Meyerhoff, D. J. (2007). Neurobiological and neurocognitive effects of chronic cigarette smoking and alcoholism. Front. Biosci. 12:4079-100. doi: 10.2741/2373

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Erblich, J., and Bovbjerg, D. H. (2004). In vivo versus imaginal smoking cue exposures: is seeing believing? Exp. Clin. Psychopharmacol. 12, 208–215. doi: 10.1037/1064-1297.12.3.208

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Erblich, J., and Michalowski, A. (2015). Impulsivity moderates the relationship between previous quit failure and cue-induced craving. Addict. Behav. 51, 7–11. doi: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2015.06.044

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Ferguson, S. G., and Shiffman, S. (2009). The relevance and treatment of cue-induced cravings in tobacco dependence. J. Subst. Abuse Treat. 36, 235–243. doi: 10.1016/j.jsat.2008.06.005

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Field, M., and Cox, W. M. (2008). Attentional bias in addictive behaviors: a review of its development, causes, and consequences. Drug Alcohol Depend 97, 1–20. doi: 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2008.03.030

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Finkenauer, R., Pomerleau, C. S., Snedecor, S. M., and Pomerleau, O. F. (2009). Race differences in factors relating to smoking initiation. Addict. Behav. 34, 1056–1059. doi: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2009.06.006

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Fiore, M. C., Novotny, T. E., Pierce, J. P., Hatziandreu, E. J., Patel, K. M., and Davis, R. M. (1989). Trends in cigarette smoking in the United States. The changing influence of gender and race. JAMA 261, 49–55. doi: 10.1001/jama.1989.03420010059033

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Fleming, K. K., Bandy, C. L., and Kimble, M. O. (2010). Decisions to shoot in a weapon identification task: the influence of cultural stereotypes and perceived threat on false positive errors. Soc. Neurosci. 5, 201–220. doi: 10.1080/17470910903268931

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Florek, E., and Piekoszewski, W. (2008). [Pharmacotherapy of smoking cessation with application of nicotine and nicotine free drugs]. Prz. Lek. 65, 700–705.

Google Scholar

Franklin, T., Wang, Z., Suh, J. J., Hazan, R., Cruz, J., Li, Y., et al. (2011). Effects of varenicline on smoking cue-triggered neural and craving responses. Arch. Gen. Psychiatry 68, 516–526. doi: 10.1001/archgenpsychiatry.2010.190

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Gendron, M., Roberson, D., van der Vyver, J. M., and Barrett, L. F. (2014). Perceptions of emotion from facial expressions are not culturally universal: evidence from a remote culture. Emotion 14, 251–262. doi: 10.1037/a0036052

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Goh, J. O., Leshikar, E. D., Sutton, B. P., Tan, J. C., Sim, S. K., Hebrank, A. C., et al. (2010). Culture differences in neural processing of faces and houses in the ventral visual cortex. Soc. Cogn. Affect. Neurosci. 5, 227–235. doi: 10.1093/scan/nsq060

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Goto, S. G., Yee, A., Lowenberg, K., and Lewis, R. S. (2013). Cultural differences in sensitivity to social context: detecting affective incongruity using the N400. Soc. Neurosci. 8, 63–74. doi: 10.1080/17470919.2012.739202

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Greck, M. D., Shi, Z., Wang, G., Zuo, X., Yang, X., Wang, X., et al. (2012). Culture modulates brain activity during empathy with anger. Neuroimage 59, 2871–2882. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2011.09.052

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Greer, T. M., Vendemia, J. M. C., and Stancil, M. (2012). Neural correlates of race-related social evaluations for African Americans and White Americans. Neuropsychology 26, 704–712. doi: 10.1037/a0030035

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Gutchess, A. H., Welsh, R. C., Boduroglu, A., and Park, D. C. (2006). Cultural differences in neural function associated with object processing. Cogn. Affect. Behav. Neurosci. 6, 102–109. doi: 10.3758/CABN.6.2.102

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Hayashi, T., Ji, H. K., Strafella, A. P., and Dagher, A. (2013). Dorsolateral prefrontal and orbitofrontal cortex interactions during self-control of cigarette craving. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 110, 4422–4427. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1212185110

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Hedden, T., Ketay, S., Aron, A., Markus, H. R., and Gabrieli, J. D. (2008). Cultural influences on neural substrates of attentional control. Psychol. Sci. 19, 12–17. doi: 10.1111/j.1467-9280.2008.02038.x

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Hyman, S. E. (2005). Addiction: a disease of learning and memory. Am. J. Psychiatry 162, 1414–1422. doi: 10.1176/appi.ajp.162.8.1414

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Koob, G. F., and Moal, M. L. (2005). Neurobiology of Addiction. Cambridge, MA: Elsevier Academic.

Google Scholar

Krentzman, A. R., Battle, D., Pagano, M. E., Andrade, F. H., Bradley, J. C., Delva, J., et al. (2012). The role of religiousness on substance-use disorder treatment outcomes: a comparison of Black and White Adolescents. J. Soc. Social Work Res. 3, 113–128. doi: 10.5243/jsswr.2012.8

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Larsen, H., Kong, G., Becker, D., Cousijn, J., Boendermaker, W., Cavallo, D., et al. (2014). Implicit motivational processes underlying smoking in american and dutch adolescents. Front. Psychiatry 5:51. doi: 10.3389/fpsyt.2014.00051

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Lerman, C., Gu, H., Loughead, J., Ruparel, K., Yang, Y., and Stein, E. A. (2014). Large-scale brain network coupling predicts acute nicotine abstinence effects on craving and cognitive function. JAMA Psychiatry 71, 523–530. doi: 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2013.4091

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Lewis, R. S., Goto, S. G., and Kong, L. L. (2008). Culture and context: East Asian American and European American differences in P3 event-related potentials and self-construal. Pers. Soc. Psychol. Bull. 34, 623–634. doi: 10.1177/0146167207313731

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Li, Y. F., Feng, Q. Z., Gao, W. Q., Zhang, X. J., Huang, Y., and Chen, Y. D. (2015). The difference between Asian and Western in the effect of LDL-C lowering therapy on coronary atherosclerotic plaque: a meta-analysis report. BMC Cardiovasc. Disord. 15:1–19. doi: 10.1186/1471-2261-15-6

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Liao, Y., Tang, J., Liu, T., Chen, X., and Hao, W. (2012). Differences between smokers and non-smokers in regional gray matter volumes: a voxel-based morphometry study. Addict. Biol. 17, 977–980. doi: 10.1111/j.1369-1600.2010.00250.x

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Lieberman, M. D., Hariri, A., Jarcho, J. M., Eisenberger, N. I., and Bookheimer, S. Y. (2005). An fMRI investigation of race-related amygdala activity in African-American and Caucasian-American individuals. Nat. Neurosci. 8, 720–722. doi: 10.1038/nn1465

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Littel, M., and Franken, I. H. A. (2007). The effects of prolonged abstinence on the processing of smoking cues: an ERP study among smokers, ex-smokers and never-smokers. J. Psychopharmacol. 21, 873–882. doi: 10.1177/0269881107078494

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Liu, P., Rigoulot, S., and Pell, M. D. (2015). Culture modulates the brain response to human expressions of emotion: electrophysiological evidence. Neuropsychologia 67, 1–13. doi: 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2014.11.034

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Luijten, M., Veltman, D. J., van den Brink, W., Hester, R., Field, M., Smits, M., et al. (2011). Neurobiological substrate of smoking-related attentional bias. Neuroimage 54, 2374–2381. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2010.09.064

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Lun, J., Oishi, S., Coan, J. A., Akimoto, S., and Miao, F. F. (2010). Cultural variations in motivational responses to felt misunderstanding. Pers. Soc. Psychol. Bull. 36, 986–996. doi: 10.1177/0146167210362979

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Marianne, L., Euser, A. S., Munafò, M. R., and Franken, I. H. A. (2012). Electrophysiological indices of biased cognitive processing of substance-related cues: a meta-analysis. Neurosci. Biobehav. Rev. 36, 1803–1816. doi: 10.1016/j.neubiorev.2012.05.001

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Masuda, T., Russell, M. J., Chen, Y. Y., Hioki, K., and Caplan, J. B. (2014). N400 incongruity effect in an episodic memory task reveals different strategies for handling irrelevant contextual information for Japanese than European Canadians. Cogn. Neurosci. 5, 17–25. doi: 10.1080/17588928.2013.831819

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Mcclernon, F. J., Hiott, F. B., Huettel, S. A., and Rose, J. E. (2005). Abstinence-induced changes in self-report craving correlate with event-related FMRI responses to smoking cues. Neuropsychopharmacology 30, 1940–1947. doi: 10.1038/sj.npp.1300780

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Mcdonough, B. E., and Warren, C. A. (2001). Effects of 12-h tobacco deprivation on event-related potentials elicited by visual smoking cues. Psychopharmacology 154, 282–291. doi: 10.1007/s002130000647

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Moriguchi, Y., Ohnishi, T. T., Mori, T., Hirakata, M., Yamada, M., Matsuda, H., et al. (2005). Specific brain activation in Japanese and Caucasian people to fearful faces. Neuroreport 16, 133–136. doi: 10.1097/00001756-200502080-00012

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Moss, E. M., Davidson, R. J., and Saron, C. (1985). Cross-cultural differences in hemisphericity: EEG asymmetry discriminates between Japanese and Westerners ✰. Neuropsychologia 23, 131–135. doi: 10.1016/0028-3932(85)90054-5

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Murata, A., Moser, J. S., and Kitayama, S. (2012). Culture shapes electrocortical responses during emotion suppression. Soc. Cogn. Affect. Neurosci. 49, 595–601. doi: 10.1093/scan/nss036

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Myrick, H., Anton, R. F., Li, X., Henderson, S., Drobes, D., Voronin, K., et al. (2004). Differential brain activity in alcoholics and social drinkers to alcohol cues: relationship to craving. Neuropsychopharmacology 29, 393–402. doi: 10.1038/sj.npp.1300295

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Nagoshi, C. T., Nakata, T., Sasano, K., and Wood, M. D. (1994). Alcohol norms, expectancies, and reasons for drinking and alcohol use in a U.S. versus a Japanese college sample. Alcohol. Clin. Exp. Res. 18, 671–678. doi: 10.1111/j.1530-0277.1994.tb00929.x

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Namkoong, K., Lee, E., Lee, C. H., Lee, B. O., and An, S. K. (2004). Increased P3 amplitudes induced by Alcohol-Related pictures in patients with alcohol dependence. Alcohol. Clin. Exp. Res. 28, 1317–1323. doi: 10.1097/01.ALC.0000139828.78099.69

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Nisbett, R. E., and Miyamoto, Y. (2005). The influence of culture: holistic versus analytic perception. Trends Cogn. Sci. 9, 467–473. doi: 10.1016/j.tics.2005.08.004

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Nisbett, R. E., Peng, K., Choi, I., and Norenzayan, A. (2001). Culture and systems of thought: holistic versus analytic cognition. Psychol. Rev. 108, 291–310. doi: 10.1037/0033-295X.108.2.291

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Okuyemi, K. S., Powell, J. N., Savage, C. R., Hall, S. B., Nollen, N., Holsen, L. M., et al. (2006). Enhanced cue-elicited brain activation in African American compared with Caucasian smokers: an fMRI study. Addict. Biol. 11, 97–106.

Google Scholar

Patel, D. R., and Feucht, C. (2010). Pharmacologic agents for smoking cessation: a clinical review. Clin. Pharmacol. 2, 17–29. doi: 10.2147/CPAA.S8788

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Petit, G., Cimochowska, A., Cevallos, C., Cheron, G., Kornreich, C., Hanak, C., et al. (2015). Reduced processing of alcohol cues predicts abstinence in recently detoxified alcoholic patients in a three-month follow up period: an ERP study. Behav. Brain Res. 282, 84–94. doi: 10.1016/j.bbr.2014.12.057

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Piko, B. F. (2007). Motives for smoking and drinking: country and gender differences in samples of Hungarian and US high school students. Addict. Behav. 32, 2087–2098. doi: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2007.01.013

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Ramirez, J. J., Monti, P. M., and Colwill, R. M. (2014). Alcohol-Cue exposure effects on craving and attentional bias in underage college-student drinkers. Psychol. Addict. Behav. 29, 317–322. doi: 10.1037/adb0000028

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Ray, R., Schnoll, R. A., and Lerman, C. (2009). Nicotine dependence: biology, behavior, and treatment. Annu. Rev. Med. 60, 247–260. doi: 10.1146/annurev.med.60.041707.160511

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Robbins, T. W., Ersche, K. D., and Everitt, B. J. (2008). Drug addiction and the memory systems of the brain. Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci. 1141, 1–21. doi: 10.1196/annals.1441.020

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Sánchez-Johnsen, L., Ahluwalia, J. S., Fitzgibbon, M., and Spring, B. J. (2006). Ethnic similarities and differences in reasons for smoking. Addict. Behav. 31, 544–548. doi: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2005.05.029

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Schultz, W., Dayan, P., and Montague, P. R. (1997). A neural substrate of prediction and reward. Science 275, 1593–1599. doi: 10.1126/science.275.5306.1593

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Seo, D., Jia, Z., Lacadie, C. M., Tsou, K. A., Bergquist, K., and Sinha, R. (2011). Sex differences in neural responses to stress and alcohol context cues. Hum. Brain Mapp. 32, 1998–2013. doi: 10.1002/hbm.21165

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Shiffman, S., Dunbar, M., Kirchner, T., Li, X., Tindle, H., Anderson, S., et al. (2013). Smoker reactivity to cues: effects on craving and on smoking behavior. J. Abnorm. Psychol. 122, 264–280. doi: 10.1037/a0028339

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Sinha, R., and Li, C. S. (2007). Imaging stress- and cue-induced drug and alcohol craving: association with relapse and clinical implications. Drug Alcohol Rev. 26, 25–31. doi: 10.1080/09595230601036960

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Suh, E., Diener, E., Oishi, S., and Triandis, H. C. (1998). The shifting basis of life satisfaction judgments across cultures: emotions versus norms. J. Pers. Soc. Psychol. 74, 482–493. doi: 10.1037/0022-3514.74.2.482

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Sul, S., Choi, I., and Kang, P. (2012). Cultural modulation of self-referential brain activity for personality traits and social identities. Soc. Neurosci. 7, 280–291. doi: 10.1080/17470919.2011.614001

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Vecchiato, G., Astolfi, L., De Vico Fallani, F., Toppi, J., Aloise, F., Bez, F., et al. (2011). On the use of EEG or MEG brain imaging tools in neuromarketing research. Comput. Intell. Neurosci. 2011:643489. doi: 10.1155/2011/643489

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Vizioli, L., Foreman, K., Rousselet, G. A., and Caldara, R. (2010). Inverting faces elicits sensitivity to race on the N170 component: a cross-cultural study. J. Vis. 10, 11–23. doi: 10.1167/10.1.15

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Vollstädt-Klein, S., Hermann, D., Rabinstein, J., Wichert, S., Klein, O., Ende, G., et al. (2010a). Increased activation of the ACC during a spatial working memory task in alcohol-dependence versus heavy social drinking. Alcohol. Clin. Exp. Res. 34, 771–776. doi: 10.1111/j.1530-0277.2010.01149.x

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Vollstädt-Klein, S., Kobiella, A., Buhler, M., Graf, C., Fehr, C., Mann, K., et al. (2011a). Severity of dependence modulates smokers’ neuronal cue reactivity and cigarette craving elicited by tobacco advertisement. Addict. Biol. 16, 166–175. doi: 10.1111/j.1369-1600.2010.00207.x

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Vollstädt-Klein, S., Loeber, S., Goltz, C. V. D., Kirsch, M., Richter, A., Mann, K. F., et al. (2009). Extinction of fMRI cue-reactivity by cue-exposure based training in alcoholics. Neuroimage 47(Suppl. 1):S54. doi: 10.1007/s00213-015-3882-5

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Vollstädt-Klein, S., Loeber, S., Kirsch, M., Bach, P., Richter, A., Buhler, M., et al. (2011b). Effects of cue-exposure treatment on neural cue reactivity in alcohol dependence: a randomized trial. Biol. Psychiatry 69, 1060–1066. doi: 10.1016/j.biopsych.2010.12.016

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Vollstädt-Klein, S., Loeber, S., Richter, A., Kirsch, M., Bach, P., von der Goltz, C., et al. (2012). Validating incentive salience with functional magnetic resonance imaging: association between mesolimbic cue reactivity and attentional bias in alcohol-dependent patients. Addict. Biol. 17, 807–816. doi: 10.1111/j.1369-1600.2011.00352.x

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Vollstädt-Klein, S., Wichert, S., Rabinstein, J., Buhler, M., Klein, O., Ende, G., et al. (2010b). Initial, habitual and compulsive alcohol use is characterized by a shift of cue processing from ventral to dorsal striatum. Addiction 105, 1741–1749. doi: 10.1111/j.1360-0443.2010.03022.x

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Wiers, R. W., Boelema, S. R., Nikolaou, K., and Gladwin, T. E. (2015). On the development of implicit and control processes in relation to substance use in adolescence. Curr. Addict. Rep. 2, 141–155. doi: 10.1007/s40429-015-0053-z

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Wiers, R. W., Gladwin, T. E., Hofmann, W., Salemink, E., and Ridderinkhof, K. R. (2013). Cognitive bias modification and cognitive control training in addiction and related psychopathology mechanisms, clinical perspectives, and ways forward. Clin. Psychol. Sci. 1, 192–212.

Google Scholar

Wigmore, S. W., and Hinson, R. E. (1991). The influence of setting on consumption in the balanced placebo design. Br. J. Addict. 86, 205–215. doi: 10.1111/j.1360-0443.1991.tb01770.x

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Williams, D. D. G. (1980). Effects of cigarette smoking on immediate memory and performance in different kinds of smoker. Br. J. Psychol. 71, 83–90. doi: 10.1111/j.2044-8295.1980.tb02732.x

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Wray, J. M., Gass, J. C., and Tiffany, S. T. (2013). A systematic review of the relationships between craving and smoking cessation. Nicotine Tob. Res. 15, 1167–1182. doi: 10.1093/ntr/nts268

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Yarmush, D. E., Manchery, L., Luehring-Jones, P., and Erblich, J. (2016). Gender and impulsivity: effects on cue-induced alcohol craving. Alcohol. Clin. Exp. Res. 40, 1052–1057. doi: 10.1111/acer.13030

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Zane, N., and Sasao, T. (2010). Research on drug abuse among Asian Pacific Americans. Drugs Soc. 6, 181–209. doi: 10.1300/J023v06n03_01

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Zhang, X., Chen, X., Yu, Y., Sun, D., Ma, N., He, S., et al. (2009). Masked smoking-related images modulate brain activity in smokers. Hum. Brain Mapp. 30, 896–907. doi: 10.1002/hbm.20552

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Zhang, X., Salmeron, B. J., Ross, T. J., Geng, X., Yang, Y., and Stein, E. A. (2011a). Factors underlying prefrontal and insula structural alterations in smokers. Neuroimage 54, 42–48. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2010.08.008

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Zhang, X., Salmeron, B. J., Ross, T. J., Gu, H., Geng, X., Yang, Y., et al. (2011b). Anatomical differences and network characteristics underlying smoking cue reactivity. Neuroimage 54, 131–141. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2010.07.063

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Zhu, Y., Zhang, L., Fan, J., and Han, S. (2007). Neural basis of cultural influence on self-representation. Neuroimage 34, 1310–1316. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2006.08.047

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Keywords: nicotine, alcohol, addiction, cross-culture, cue reactivity, context, emotion, attention

Citation: Lv W, Wu Q, Liu X, Chen Y, Song H, Yang L and Zhang X (2016) Cue Reactivity in Nicotine and Alcohol Addiction: A Cross-Cultural View. Front. Psychol. 7:1335. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2016.01335

Received: 29 June 2016; Accepted: 22 August 2016;
Published: 31 August 2016.

Edited by:

Xi-Nian Zuo, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China

Reviewed by:

Delin Sun, Duke University, USA
Zhao-xin Wang, East China Normal University, China

Copyright © 2016 Lv, Wu, Liu, Chen, Song, Yang and Zhang. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.

*Correspondence: Xiaochu Zhang, zxcustc@ustc.edu.cn

These authors have contributed equally to this work.