Impact Factor 2.129 | CiteScore 2.40
More on impact ›

Correction ARTICLE

Front. Psychol., 18 October 2019 | https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2019.01737

Corrigendum: Subjective and Oxytocinergic Responses to Mindfulness Are Associated With Subjective and Oxytocinergic Responses to Sexual Arousal

  • 1Program in Human Sexuality, Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, United States
  • 2Diamond Laboratory, Department of Psychology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, United States

A Corrigendum on
Subjective and Oxytocinergic Responses to Mindfulness Are Associated With Subjective and Oxytocinergic Responses to Sexual Arousal

by Dickenson, J. A., Alley, J., and Diamond, L. M. (2019). Front. Psychol. 10:1101. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2019.01101

In the original article, there was an error. The citation for “Brotto et al., 2008” was incorrectly written. It should be “Brotto et al., 2012.”

A correction has been made to the Discussion, paragraph seven:

“The current study has important implications for the treatment of sexual arousal concerns. Mindfulness-based therapies have shown promise in their effectiveness in treating female arousal difficulties. Our study demonstrated that women with greater arousability also showed greater neuroendocrine responses to both arousal and mindfulness inductions. This findings begs the question, could such neuroendocrine responsivity, specifically oxytocin responsivity, differentiate who may benefit the most from mindfulness-based interventions? Prior research has reflected the question presented above, demonstrating that mindfulness-based therapies are more effective for women with histories childhood sexual abuse (Brotto et al., 2012). Given that women with histories of childhood sexual abuse show different stress responses (Meston and Lorenz, 2013) and oxytocinergic profiles (Heim et al., 2008; Pierrehumbert et al., 2010), perhaps such modifications in the oxytocinergic system makes these women more sensitive to interventions that impact their oxytocin system, such as mindfulness training.”

The reference has also been changed to reflect this correction from “Brotto, L. A., Basson, R., and Luria, M. (2008). A mindfulness-based group psychoeducational intervention targeting sexual arousal disorder in women. J. Sex. Med. 5, 1646–1659. doi: 10.1111/j.1743-6109.2008.00850.x” to “Brotto, L. A., Seal, B. N., and Rellini, A. (2012). Pilot study of a brief cognitive behavioral versus mindfulness-based intervention for women with sexual distress and a history of childhood sexual abuse. J. Sex Marital Ther. 38, 1–27. doi: 10.1080/0092623X.2011.569636”.

The authors apologize for this error and state that this does not change the scientific conclusions of the article in any way. The original article has been updated.

References

Brotto, L. A., Seal, B. N., and Rellini, A. (2012). Pilot study of a brief cognitive behavioral versus mindfulness-based intervention for women with sexual distress and a history of childhood sexual abuse. J. Sex Marital Ther. 38, 1–27. doi: 10.1080/0092623X.2011.569636

PubMed Abstract | CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Heim, C., Young, L. J., Newport, D. J., Mletzko, T., Miller, A. H., and Nemeroff, C. B. (2008). Lower csf oxytocin concentrations in women with a history of childhood abuse. Mol. Psychiatry 14, 954–958. doi: 10.1038/mp.2008.112

PubMed Abstract | CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Meston, C. M., and Lorenz, T. A. (2013). Physiological stress responses predict sexual functioning and satisfaction differently in women who have and have not been sexually abused in childhood. Psychol. Trauma 5, 350–358. doi: 10.1037/a0027706

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Pierrehumbert, B., Torrisi, R., Laufer, D., Halfon, O., Ansermet, F., and Beck Popovic, M. (2010). Oxytocin response to an experimental psychosocial challenge in adults exposed to traumatic experiences during childhood or adolescence. Neuroscience 166, 168–177. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2009.12.016

CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar

Keywords: oxytocin, sexual arousal, mindfulness, attentional shifts, women, sexual health

Citation: Dickenson JA, Alley J and Diamond LM (2019) Corrigendum: Subjective and Oxytocinergic Responses to Mindfulness Are Associated With Subjective and Oxytocinergic Responses to Sexual Arousal. Front. Psychol. 10:1737. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2019.01737

Received: 22 May 2019; Accepted: 12 July 2019;
Published: 18 October 2019.

Edited and reviewed by: Beate Ditzen, Heidelberg University Hospital, Germany

Copyright © 2019 Dickenson, Alley and Diamond. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.

*Correspondence: Janna A. Dickenson, Jdickens@umn.edu; jannadickenson@gmail.com