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Review ARTICLE Provisionally accepted The full-text will be published soon. Notify me

Front. Plant Sci. | doi: 10.3389/fpls.2019.01091

Get the balance right: ROS homeostasis and redox signalling in fruit

  • 1UMR 1332 BFP Université de Bordeaux, INRA Centre Bordeaux-Aquitaine, France
  • 2INRA Centre Bordeaux-Aquitaine, France
  • 3Genetics and Improvement of Fruit and Vegetables (INRA), France
  • 4Plateforme Métabolome Bordeaux, MetaboHUB, Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique Centre Bordeaux, France
  • 5Plateforme Metabolome Bordeaux, MetaboHUB, Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique Centre Bordeaux, France

Plant central metabolism generates reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are key regulators that mediate signalling pathways involved in developmental processes and plant responses to environmental fluctuations. These highly reactive metabolites can lead to cellular damage when the reduction-oxidation (redox) homeostasis becomes unbalanced. While decades of research have studied redox homeostasis in leaves, fundamental knowledge in fruit biology is still fragmentary. This is even more surprising when considering the natural profusion of fruit antioxidants that can process ROS and benefit human health. In this review, we explore redox biology in fruit and provide an overview of fruit antioxidants with recent examples. We further examine the central role of the redox hub in signalling during development and stress, with particular emphasis on ascorbate, also referred to as vitamin C. Progress in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in the redox regulations that are linked to central metabolism and stress pathways will help to define novel strategies for optimising fruit nutritional quality, fruit production and storage.

Keywords: redox, Fruit, ROS, Metabolism, ascorbate, Glutathione, NAD, Tomato

Received: 13 Feb 2019; Accepted: 09 Aug 2019.

Copyright: © 2019 Decros, Baldet, Beauvoit, Stevens, Flandin, Colombie, Gibon and Pétriacq. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.

* Correspondence:
Mr. Guillaume Decros, INRA Centre Bordeaux-Aquitaine, UMR 1332 BFP Université de Bordeaux, Bordeaux, 33140, Aquitaine, France, guillaume.decros@inra.fr
Dr. Pierre Pétriacq, INRA Centre Bordeaux-Aquitaine, UMR 1332 BFP Université de Bordeaux, Bordeaux, 33140, Aquitaine, France, pierre.petriacq@inra.fr