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Original Research ARTICLE Provisionally accepted The full-text will be published soon. Notify me

Front. Plant Sci. | doi: 10.3389/fpls.2019.01541

The Genome Sequence of Gossypioides kirkii Illustrates a Descending Dysploidy in Plants

  • 1Crop Germplasm Research, Southern Plains Agricultural Research Center, Agricultural Research Service, United State Department of Agriculture, United States
  • 2Section of Plant Breeding and Genetics, School of Integrative Plant Science, Cornell University, United States
  • 3National Center for Genome Resources, United States
  • 4Iowa State University, Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Iowa State University, United States
  • 5Key Laboratory of Molecular Epigenetics of MOE, Northeast Normal University, China
  • 6Institute for Genomics, Biocomputing & Biotechnology, Bagley College of Engineering, Mississippi State University, United States
  • 7Facility of Genome Informatics, Iowa State University, United States

One of the extraordinary aspects of plant genome evolution is variation in chromosome number, particularly that among closely related species. This is exemplified by the cotton genus (Gossypium) and its relatives, where most species and genera have a base chromosome number of 13. The two exceptions are sister genera that have n=12 (the Hawaiian Kokia and the East African and Madagascan Gossypioides). We generated a high-quality genome sequence of Gossypioides kirkii (n=12) using PacBio, Bionano, and Hi-C technologies, and compared this assembly to genome sequences of Kokia (n=12) and Gossypium diploids (n=13). Previous analysis demonstrated that the directionality of their reduced chromosome number was through large structural rearrangements. A series of structural rearrangements were identified comparing the de novo G. kirkii genome sequence to genome sequences of Gossypium, including chromosome fusions and inversions. Genome comparison between G. kirkii and Gossypium suggests that multiple steps are required to generate the extant structural differences.

Keywords: speciation, chromosome evolution, Cotton, structural rearrangements, Gossypieae

Received: 16 May 2019; Accepted: 05 Nov 2019.

Copyright: © 2019 Udall, Long, Ramaraj, Conover, Yuan, Grover, Gong, Arick II, Masonbrink, Peterson and Wendel. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.

* Correspondence:
Dr. Joshua A. Udall, Crop Germplasm Research, Southern Plains Agricultural Research Center, Agricultural Research Service, United State Department of Agriculture, College Station, United States, Joshua.udall@usda.gov
Dr. Jonathan F. Wendel, Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Iowa State University, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa, United States, jfw@iastate.edu