Research Topic

Exercise Addiction – Prevalence, Correlates, and Interventions

About this Research Topic

Regular and sustained participation in physical activity and exercise (one domain of physical activity) is positively associated with almost every facet of health. However, there is evidence suggesting that for a subset of people, exercise can become obsessive, or compulsive (or both), to a point where negative health outcomes are experienced. These can include physical outcomes such as bone fractures, psychological outcomes such as increased anxiety, and social outcomes including the detriment of social relationships and financial debt. Several terms have been used to describe the phenomenon, including `exercise dependence' and `compulsive exercise'.

Despite the negative outcomes exercise addiction yields, there is, to date, only a small body of literature investigating this phenomenon. In order to develop effective and targeted interventions, more knowledge is needed on the prevalence of primary and secondary (second to an eating disorder) exercise addictions and their associated correlates.

The goal of this Research Topic is to advance our knowledge of the prevalence, correlates and outcomes associated with exercise addiction. We anticipate that these questions may be addressed using a variety of methods including, but not limited to, qualitative studies and observational approaches, alongside experiments, controlled trials and systematic reviews. Article types including Original Research, Reviews and General Commentary articles are welcomed.

Potential topics
• Exercise addiction: a case study approach
• Secondary exercise addiction: exploring potential primary conditions
• Body dysmorphia, eating disorders, and exercise addiction: exploring mediating relationships
• Exercise addiction: challenges for future research
• The role of personality in exercise addiction
• The role of perceived inter-personal support/social relationships in exercise addiction
• Exploring identity and exercise addiction

We would also like to acknowledge that Mike Trott (Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, United Kingdom) acted as a Topic Coordinator and has contributed to the preparation of the proposal of this Research Topic.


Keywords: Exercise Addiction, Eating Disorders, Exercise Dependence, Addiction, Pathological Exercise


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Regular and sustained participation in physical activity and exercise (one domain of physical activity) is positively associated with almost every facet of health. However, there is evidence suggesting that for a subset of people, exercise can become obsessive, or compulsive (or both), to a point where negative health outcomes are experienced. These can include physical outcomes such as bone fractures, psychological outcomes such as increased anxiety, and social outcomes including the detriment of social relationships and financial debt. Several terms have been used to describe the phenomenon, including `exercise dependence' and `compulsive exercise'.

Despite the negative outcomes exercise addiction yields, there is, to date, only a small body of literature investigating this phenomenon. In order to develop effective and targeted interventions, more knowledge is needed on the prevalence of primary and secondary (second to an eating disorder) exercise addictions and their associated correlates.

The goal of this Research Topic is to advance our knowledge of the prevalence, correlates and outcomes associated with exercise addiction. We anticipate that these questions may be addressed using a variety of methods including, but not limited to, qualitative studies and observational approaches, alongside experiments, controlled trials and systematic reviews. Article types including Original Research, Reviews and General Commentary articles are welcomed.

Potential topics
• Exercise addiction: a case study approach
• Secondary exercise addiction: exploring potential primary conditions
• Body dysmorphia, eating disorders, and exercise addiction: exploring mediating relationships
• Exercise addiction: challenges for future research
• The role of personality in exercise addiction
• The role of perceived inter-personal support/social relationships in exercise addiction
• Exploring identity and exercise addiction

We would also like to acknowledge that Mike Trott (Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, United Kingdom) acted as a Topic Coordinator and has contributed to the preparation of the proposal of this Research Topic.


Keywords: Exercise Addiction, Eating Disorders, Exercise Dependence, Addiction, Pathological Exercise


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

11 September 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

11 September 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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